VL

Psychology WWW Virtual Library


    HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

  • Classics in the History of Psychology (York University, Canada)
    http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/
    [An internet resource developed by Christopher D. Green as "an effort to make the full texts of a large number of historically significant public domain documents from the scholarly literature of psychology and allied disciplines available on the World Wide Web." See also his Classics in the History of Psychology Links.]
  • Library Guide: A History of Psychology
    http://neiulibrary.libguides.com/psychology/395
    [A bibliography of printed works prepared by Miriam E. Joseph at Sain Louis University for use by students enrolled in Dr. James H. Korn's History of Psychology course.]
  • Lifschitz (Virtual) Psychology Museum
    http://echo.gmu.edu/node/2488
    ["Exhibits" on the history of psychology feature leading figures as well as humor.]
  • Mind and Body - René Descartes to William James (Bryn Mawr College, USA)
    http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/Mind/Table.html
    [Resources to support an undergraduate course on the history of psychology.]
  • Today in the History of Psychology
    http://www.cwu.edu/~warren/today.html
    [A date-clickable calendar leading to notable events in the history of psychology, organized by day of the year.]

    Individual "Psychologists"
  • Socrates (???-399BCE)
    [An excellent series of pages on "The Last Days of Socrates" from Clarke College. The usual four Platonic dialogues (Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo) are the basis for this useful web resource. See also the ambitious and as yet incomplete Plato and his dialogues which divides the Platonic dialogues into the traditional groups of four and develops teaching categories on that basis. See also Plato's version of the trial of Socrates in the Apology. Where does the history of psychology begin? Some observers would propose that Socrates is the best place to start.]
  • René Descartes (1596-1650)
    [The above site offers an excellent introduction to Descartes and there is an English translation of the Discourse on Method elsewhere on the current site, too. It is difficult to over-estimate the historical significance of Descartes for the human sciences, including psychology.]
  • David Hume (1711-1776)
    [The above link is to the index of entries to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy under the letter 'H' which connects to several useful articles on David Hume. See also The Hume Society page and Ty's David Hume Homepage. Hume functions as part of the intellectual background to some important stands of contemporary empirical, perceptual, and cognitive studies.]
  • Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773-1843)
    [Part of the 19th century German background of modern psychology.]
  • Frederich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900)
    [A forerunner of some 20th century psychological theorists, including Freud.]
  • William James (1842-1910)
    [Well-presented links to writings by James and commentary on James at a page maintained by Professor Frank Pajares at Emory University. Do not miss James' own essay on "the Ph.D. octopus." Locally available is The Webbing of William James, by Marc Fonda. There is also a useful paper by Jonathan Schull called William and the World Wide Web.]
  • Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)
    [The father of Psycho-analysis.]
  • Carl Gustav Jung (1905-1961)
    [Also worth noting is Marc Fonda's Notes on Jung which includes his lecture notes on Jung's Answer to Job. In addition, the Archetypal Astrology page of Michael McLay includes a list of Jungian links.]
  • George Kelly
    http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/kelly.html
    [A Personal Construct Psychology page maintained at the University of Calgary.]
  • Personality and Consciousness
    http://www.wynja.com/personality/theorists.html
    [Brief sketches and links on theorists Freud, Jung, Adler, Kelly, Lewin, Maslow, Rogers, Skinner, Tart, and various Buddhists. Part of a site on Greater Anthropology maintained by Eric Pettifor of Simon Fraser University.]
  • Self Psychology Page
    http://www.selfpsychology.com/
    [Site dedicated to the work and influence of Heinz Kohut (1913-1981).]
Where Have All the Women Gone?
In this regard, see the International Council of Psychologists which was founded in 1941 as the National Council of Women Psychologists, organized in the United States "to make the service of women psychologists more readily available to assist with the war effort." Also see Women Groundbreakers in the History of Canadian Psychology: World War II and its Aftermath which is the abstract of a paper by Mary J. Wright, University of Western Ontario, reprinted from Canadian Psychology 33:2 (1993).


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